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2006-2007: Media Sustainability Index – Georgia Review

Country average score: 2.4
Free Speech: 2.73, Professional Journalism: 2.09,
Plurality Of News Sources:2.62, Business Management:2.14
Supporting Institutions: 2.42
MSI: Near Unsustainable
MSI: Unsustainable Mixed System

  • Number of active print outlets, radio stations, television stations:
    82 licenses awarded (GNCC): 68 for general broadcasting (39 television, 25 radio, 2 radio and television, 2 unidentified); 14 for specialized broadcasting (5 television, 8 radio, 1 television and radio)
    According to the electronic portal, Media.ge, 120 newspapers are published in Georgia.
  • Newspaper circulation statistics (total circulation and circulation of largest paper):
    Kviris Palitra (weekly, Tbilsi): approximate weekly circulation: 50,000–60,000 (Information provided by the newspaper.) Rezonansi (daily, Tbilisi): approximate daily circulation: 5,000–7,000; Tuesday insert Mteli Kvira (whole week): approximate circulation: 6,000; Sunday insert Basta (entertainment): approximate circulation: 4,000 (Information provided by the newspaper.) 24 Saati (daily, Tbilisi): approximate daily circulation: 4,700–4,800 on Mondays; 4,000–4,200 on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays; 5,500 on Saturday (Information provided by the newspaper.)
  • Broadcast ratings (top three ranked stations):
    TV MR GE, Licensee of AGB Nielsen Media Research, December 2006: Tbilisi share of television audience: Rustavi 2: 5.51%; Imedi: 4.12%; Public Broadcaster of Georgia: 1.06%, Region’s share of television audience:  Imedi: 5.97%; Rustavi 2: 5.15%; Public Broadcaster of Georgia: 0.93%, Tbilisi and Regions share of television audience: Rustavi 2: 5.38%; Imedi: 4.77%; Public Broadcaster of Georgia: 1.02%
  • News agencies:
    AP Bureau, Reuters Bureau, Black Sea Press, Novosti Gruzia, Sarke, Interpressnews, Infozavri, Iprinda, Kavkazpress, Media News, Prime News, Prime News Business (business news), GBC News (economy, business), GHN (Georgian Hot News), France Press (local representative) (www. yellowpages.ge)
  • Annual advertising revenue in media sector:
    According to TV, television advertising market reached approximately $13 million in 2006. Estimations for 2007 are $16–17 million. (MR GE, Licensee of AGB Nielsen Media Research)
  • Number of Internet users:
    175,600 (2005) CIA World Factbook

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2006: Voting Practices at the United Nations – Georgia Review

The Voting Practices at the United Nations report assesses the voting practices of the governments of UN member states in the General Assembly and Security Council for 2006

Voting Coincidence Percentages
Overall Votes (94): Agree 30, Disagree 44, Abstain 19, Absent 1: 40.5%
—Including All 174 Consensus Resolutions: 82.1%
—Arms Control: 41.7%; Human Rights: 72.2%; Middle East: 11.8%
Important Votes (13): Agree 5, Disagree 3, Abstain 5, Absent 0: 62.5%
—Including the 11 Important Consensus Resolutions: 84.1%
Important Issues VOTES
1. U.S. Embargo of Cuba…………………………………………………………….(N) Y
2. Human Rights in Uzbekistan …………………………………………………..(N) N
3. Committee on the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People………(N) A
4. Division for Palestinian Rights of the Secretariat ………………………..(N) A
5. Illicit Trade in Small Arms and Light Weapons …………………………..(N) Y
6. Towards an Arms Trade Treaty ……………………………………………….(N) Y
7. Work of the Special Committee to Investigate Israeli Practices …….(N) A
8. Combating Defamation of Religions …………………………………………(N) N
9. Human Rights in North Korea …………………………………………………(Y) Y
10. Human Rights in Belarus……………………………………………………….(Y) Y
11. Human Rights in Iran……………………………………………………………(Y) A
12. International Trade and Development…………………………………….(N) A
13. Human Rights in Burma ………………………………………………………..(Y) Y
Votes: Y=Yes, N=No, A=Abstain, X=Absent, ( )=U.S. Vote

Source: http://www.state.gov/p/io/rls/rpt/c21928.htm

2006: Trafficking in Persons Report

Georgia is a source and transit country for women, children, and men trafficked for the purposes of sexual exploitation and forced labor. Many Georgian victims are trafficked to Turkey, mostly attributed to the lack of a visa regime between the two countries. Victims from Ukraine, Moldova, Russia, and other former Soviet states are trafficked through Georgia to Turkey, the U.A.E., Greece, and Western Europe. According to IOM, at least 500 Georgian women are trafficked abroad every year. Reports of internal trafficking for both sexual exploitation and forced labor continued. Victims are reportedly trafficked for the purpose of forced labor in the breakaway region of Abkhazia and traffickers may be using South Ossetia to traffic victims from Russia into Georgia and onwards.

The Government of Georgia does not fully comply with the minimum standards for the elimination of trafficking; however, it is making significant efforts to do so. Notably, the government increased both arrests and investigations of traffickers in 2005. The President appointed the Prosecutor General’s Office, a senior government Ministry, to lead its anti-trafficking efforts, which showed increased momentum late in the reporting period. However, the government failed to vigorously prosecute traffickers, and it did not achieve tangible progress in the protection and rehabilitation of trafficking victims. The government should implement a national victim referral, increase its convictions and sentences, ensure adequate shelter for trafficking victims, and establish witness protection so victims feel secure to testify against their exploiters. A public awareness campaign is needed to encourage victims to seek care and help reduce the stigma of trafficking victims in Georgia.

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